Friday, 25 November 2011 23:07

New Hampshire: Gay Marriage And Presidential Republican Candidates

Written by 

new-hampshire

Gay marriage is the heart of the debate in New Hampshire so it is also the heart of the debate for presidential Republican candidates.

New Hampshire lawmakers want to repeal the law allowing the marriage for gay and lesbian couples and plan to pass a measure in the coming weeks, then a vote should take place in January, but January will also correspond to the nation’s first Republican presidential primary contest hold in New Hampshire. So will the candidates follow the wish of the voters and worry about economy or should gay marriage be repealed?

Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, Texas Gov. Rick Perry and former businessman Herman Cain are republican candidates who want to repeal gay marriage even if, because of the presidential elections, they don't used the expression 'gay marriage'. They support a lot traditional marriage without being openly against gay marriage because according to an Associated Press, a growing number of younger Republicans and independents in New Hampshire support legal recognition of same-sex couples.

"As conservatives, we believe in the sanctity of life, we believe in the sanctity of traditional marriage, and I applaud those legislators in New Hampshire who are working to defend marriage between one man and one woman realizing that children need to be raised in a loving home by a mother and a father," Perry told a New Hampshire audience recently.

"We will be using all the tools at our disposal to lobby the New Hampshire legislature and the broader population," said Christopher Plante, regional director for the National Organization for Marriage. "One of those tools is the echo chamber of presidential candidates continuing to show their support of marriage as defined by one man and one woman."

We all know that if they allow gay marriage, they develop the economy.

Leave a comment

Make sure you enter the (*) required information where indicated. HTML code is not allowed.